Online Journalism: Fall 2009

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journalism websites: your links

Please link to, and introduce, two websites: One that you think encapsulates “new” journalism, the other that you think integrates social tools well. Explain why you think these are both good examples of these things.

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Filed under: Homework

15 Responses

  1. “New” Journalism: http://www.cnn.com People can say what they want about CNN’s coverage of issues but, I think this site has good organization, videos, they have podcasts and radio streams, and tons of ways for viewers to interact with the news. The fact that CNN makes so much room for “citizen journalists” is something I think makes it very good example of “new” journalism.

    Social Tools: http://www.facebook.com Facebook is really easy to use, and it’s almost TOO easy to find people who use it, along with alot of personal information, which is kind of scary sometimes. But, it’s easy to upload pictures, videos and music and you can pretty much customize your space how you like. The chat feature is a major plus when it comes to keeping in touch with people near or far, and it’s something that many other social networking sites don’t offer.

  2. The World Politics Review (www.worldpoliticsreview.com) covers international foreign policy and international news. They have original news coverage, but mostly have analysis and commentary, which is almost like a blog, albeit wonky and expertise, which I think is a new trend in journalism. They take advantage of audio, video and aggregation–a big element of the news today. And as I understand it, most of their writers are not full time employees but “contributors,” something I imagine we’ll see more of in the future.

    These are some trends in journalism with some new media asides. “New Journalism” still means to me that literary trend that took off in the 60s and continues today.

    The entire Google empire I think is leading the game in “social tools.” Gmail is an incredibly superior email service; extended conversation email chains between a group of any size has really come of age with gmail. The site’s reader function allows users to keep up with select sites they are interested in. The calendar function works very well and blends seamlessly with most mobile devices as well. And of course, your own customizable google search page. It is linked with the Picasa online photo album network, its own document creator, group site builder, yadda yadda yadda. And now the new fast flip news reader thing as well.

  3. Changed my mind. Most interesting ‘new journalism’ site:

    globalvoicesonline.org

    bringing blogging to the rest of the world, getting first hand, street level accounts of daily life.

  4. Margaret Smith says:

    New Journalism: I have to admit that Norman chose some of my top “new journalism” websites with The World Politics Review and Global Voices, but my favorite has to be Propublica. Propublia (www.propublica.org) is an independent, non-profit newsroom based in New York City that focues on investigative journalism in the public interest. With the “informational age” taking the media by storm, one of the areas of journalism that has been hit the hardest has to be investigative reporting. In a world where the public expects the news to dissemenated within the blink of an eye, true investigative journalism is hard to find in a newsroom. The creators and leaders of Propublica recognized this and found a way to incorporate their passion for investigative journalism with today’s technology. Most importantly, everything on Propublica is original content and easily accessible.

    Social tools: This may be a bit obvious, but nothing utilizes social tools quite as well as the modern blog. I’m personally a WordPress fan (www. wordpress.com), but the fact remains that with a blog literally anybody can upload pictures, videos, music, add comments, create a calender, link to other websites like their personal twitter and manage their own space. I just like WordPress better because once you figure it out, there are way more design elements than you would find in most blogs.

  5. Evan says:

    New Journalism:
    http://joystiq.com – I know it’s a video game news website, and I know there’s a TON of bias in there (summary: the Wii sucks, “Braid” is an incredible game), but I call them new journalism because they’re completely web-based. They do a lot of really good multimedia stuff – great live podcasts, photo galleries, videos, etcetera. I’m not sure what it is about them, but I think they’re really, very funny.

    Social Tools:
    A.V. Club Chicago (chicago.avclub.com) – (Full disclosure: I interned for them this past summer.) Maybe it’s not fair to say that they integrate social tools well. What I’m basing this on is their Twitter presence. I don’t follow a lot of media outlets because they tweet WAY too often. I don’t want to be Twitter-bombarded by some tiny radio station, where they update once a minute what they’re playing. What I like about A.V. Chicago is that they tweet out anything that crosses their path, on their site or no, that’s appropriate to their beat: local arts & entertainment. Three tweets in an hour? Perfect. Of course, I know that this could be said about tons of other sites.

  6. Annye says:

    A site I think exemplifies new journalism is the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/). I’m sure we’ve all heard of it, and I’m sure everyone has their opinions on it. Like it or not, I do think this is where journalism is heading, especially online journalism. Do I go there for breaking news? No. But I do like their commentary and blogs. I love that they have such a wide array of contributors and I love that it is only online.

    I’d also like to say how well the Huffington Post integrates social tools. They have their Facebook application as well as several others for the iPhone and Blackberry. They actively integrate their stories onto their Twitter feed as well as the numerous blogs that are written for the site by the many different contributors.

  7. One quick comment — my name is actually Danny Fenster. Norman Greens is a fictional character that formed the butt of an inside joke between some friends and I from adolescence. My email address, normangreens@gmail.com, is likely responsible for the mix-up. I definitely don’t mind it though, it has become a bit of a nickname, and is usually the username I use to register for things online.

  8. jeffbiertzer says:

    New Journalism: The website I use a lot is http://www.msn.com. On the homepage I can go to my email, check hard news, light news, top ten lists, fashion, business, sports, and celebrity news. When I like an article I click on it. It provides me with that article and then many links to similar stories or interest. MSN makes it easy and convenient to keep their site as my homepage. I feel that I am a few clicks away from anything.

    Social Networking: When I have free time I look around http://www.metafilter.com. Without having to become internet friends with another person, metafilter allows you to ask and answer serious or interesting questions. Last I night someone asked what albums are so good that you have to listen to the whole thing? Today another person asked can you live with a collapsed lung? Strangers can read the replies or add their own, as metafilter helps make the world a little smaller.

  9. Megan Owen says:

    New Journalism:
    I see that Annye beat me to the punch, but I really think that the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/) is an exemplary new media outlet. I think it offers engaging social commentary, and often unexpected views. I also think that it is on the forefront of challenging the ideas of who can be a journalist and what their duties in that position are.

    Social Tools:
    Flavorpill (http://flavorpill.com/chicago) offers daily breakdowns of cultural events happening in large cities across the country. (I have included the link for the Chicago site, but there are others to choose from.) They offer reviews and suggestions, and if you subscribe they will send updates to your inbox. You can also talk to other Flavorpill members, etcetera.

  10. Laura Kozak says:

    New Journalism:
    For being so “old,” NPR (http://www.npr.org/) has an amazing web presence and has really stayed on the cutting edge of news and social media. All of their commentators have Twitters, which they use often and accurately. They also have one of the top news Apps for the iPhone. I can read or listen to a top story with the touch of a button. I can search through their archives or read their different blogs. They’ve taken all the media they can get their hands on and organized it in a coherent and enjoyable way. They’re a radio station, but they do much more.

    Social Tools:
    Twitter is great but I never realized how great until I listed off all the things I can do with it. Post pictures and video, link to other sites or articles, @reply to someone for a public conversation, DM for private, favorite a tweet, retweet, join and trending topic, map myself so people can see where I am in the world, the list goes on. And all of this can be done on a mobile phone. What Twitter can’t do on its own, it can do with it’s obnoxious amount of add-on’s. At the moment, it’s the quintessential social tool.

  11. chiwoj85 says:

    ugh some of the people used the same ones I wanted, but o well.

    New Journalism: I would go with a site like yahoo.com. Like msn, it allows people to check email, view some of their favorite links about the topics that interest them the most and even link them to other sites they may be affiliated with. For those that are say, fantasy sports freaks, there is an option to play fantasy sports via yahoo. I don’t use it as much anymore, except for fantasy sports, but the site is good overall.

    Social tools: My guess would be one site that is good for this is a site like match.com or something of the sort. I’ve never used it, but you always see all these ads for it on TV, Facebook or maybe even email. It’s a way for some people who don’t have good luck in finding people to date, a way of being matched up with people that are compatible with what the person puts on their profile. If it’s not hurting anybody, what’s the harm?

  12. Mark Hertvik says:

    New Journalism: the Independent Media Center (http://www.indymedia.org/en/index.shtml) is a collective of independent journalists from around the world. The organization has a few warts – it’s unabashedly leftist and its website is ugly as sin – but it’s really good at getting street-level stories and getting into places more established media won’t or in some cases can’t go. I met my first IndyMedia reporter at an anti-Minutemen protest I was covering for my high school paper – I lost his card and forgot his name – and he and I were the only ones in the crowd talking to protesters. The local news mainly interviewed Minutemen and asked the cops about the protest later. It’s especially good at getting news out of Latin America.

    Social Media: Infoshop (http://www.infoshop.org/) is really good at organizing people and spreading the word about its causes. Its high level of participation is due to the ideology of its users. No, I’m not involved with these people anymore, but they’re good people.

  13. Sean Stillmaker says:

    New Journalism

    To entice oneself on entertainment news, http://www.darkhorizons.com/ is a one stop show for me. Objective, short stories related to the business aspect of Hollywood is the beat. They’re true reporters and don’t succumb to social media.

    Social Tools:
    http://www.myspace.com/. We now refer to the first social media site as the ugly red-headed step child we keep locked in a cage. Its demise and rapid spawning gives hope that its all a fad.

  14. Jennifer Ensign says:

    New Journalism website: Time.com, not only is Time magazine my favorite magazine, but the website keeps me informed in several different areas of interest. I can go to just one website to find, basic news stories, developments in science and health, and even celebrity gossip from the entertainment world. The site is easy to navigate, which is key for me. I know exactly where to go to find the information I want.

    Social tools website: I would have to go with Facebook. It makes everything easy, i.e. posting pictures, links, etc. I’ve never had a problem with the social network.

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